Publications des membres du Ceped

2022

2021



  • Mathevet Isadora, Ost Katarina, Traverson Lola, Ridde Valery et Zinszer Kate (2021) « Accounting for health inequities in the design of contact tracing interventions: a rapid review », medRxiv. DOI : 10.1101/2021.03.01.21252692. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.03.01.21252692v1.
    Résumé : Contact tracing has been a central COVID-19 transmission control measure. However, without the consideration of the needs of specific populations, public health interventions can exacerbate health inequities. Purpose: The purpose of this rapid review was to determine if and how health inequities were included in the design of contact tracing interventions in epidemic settings. Method: We conducted a search of the electronic databases MEDLINE and Web of Science. Our inclusion criteria included articles that: (i) described the design of contact tracing interventions, (ii) have been published between 2013 and 2020 in English, French, Spanish, Chinese, or Portuguese, (iii) and included at least 50% of empiricism, according to the Automated Classifier of Texts on Scientific Studies (ATCER) tool. We relied on various tools to extract data. Result: Following the titles and abstracts screening of 230 articles, 39 articles met the inclusion criteria. Only seven references were retained after full text review. None of the selected studies considered health inequities in the design of contact tracing interventions. Conclusion: The use of tools/concepts for incorporating health inequities, such as the REFLEX-ISS tool, and 9proportionate universalism9 when designing contact tracing interventions, would enable practitioners, decision makers, and researchers to better consider health inequities.</p>


  • Mathevet Isadora, Ost Katarina, Traverson Lola, Zinszer Kate et Ridde Valéry (2021) « Accounting for health inequities in the design of contact tracing interventions: a rapid review », International Journal of Infectious Diseases (mars 11), p. S1201971221002277. DOI : 10.1016/j.ijid.2021.03.010. https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1201971221002277.
    Résumé : Context Contact tracing has been a central COVID-19 transmission control measure. However, without the consideration of the needs of specific populations, public health interventions can exacerbate health inequities. Purpose The purpose of this rapid review was to determine if and how health inequities were included in the design of contact tracing interventions in epidemic settings. Method We conducted a search of the electronic databases MEDLINE and Web of Science. Our inclusion criteria included articles that: (i) described the design of contact tracing interventions, (ii) have been published between 2013 and 2020 in English, French, Spanish, Chinese, or Portuguese, (iii) and included at least 50% of empiricism, according to the Automated Classifier of Texts on Scientific Studies (ATCER) tool. We relied on various tools to extract data. Result Following the titles and abstracts screening of 230 articles, 39 articles met the inclusion criteria. Only seven references were retained after full text review. None of the selected studies considered health inequities in the design of contact tracing interventions. Conclusion The use of tools/concepts for incorporating health inequities, such as the REFLEX-ISS tool, and “proportionate universalism” when designing contact tracing interventions, would enable practitioners, decision makers, and researchers to better consider health inequities.


  • Ost Katarina, Duquesne Louise, Duguay Claudia, Traverson Lola, Mathevet Isadora, Ridde Valéry et Zinszer Kate (2021) « A rapid review of equity considerations in large-scale testing campaigns during infectious disease epidemics », medRxiv. DOI : 10.1101/2021.02.22.21252205. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.22.21252205v1.
    Résumé : Large-scale testing is an intervention that is instrumental for infectious disease control and a central tool for the COVID-19 pandemic. Our rapid review aimed to identify if and how equity has been considered in large-scale testing initiatives. Methods: We searched Web of Science and PubMed in November 2020 and followed PRISMA recommendations for scoping reviews. Articles were analyzed using descriptive and thematic analysis. Results: Our search resulted in 291 studies of which 41 were included for data extraction after full article screening. Most of the included articles (83%) reported on HIV-related screening programs, while the remaining programs focused on other sexually transmitted infections (n=3) or COVID-19 (n=4). None of the studies presented a formal definition of (in)equity in testing, however, 23 articles did indirectly include elements of equity in the program or intervention design, largely through the justification of their target population. Conclusion: The studies included in our rapid review did not explicitly consider equity in their design or evaluation. It is imperative that equity is incorporated into the design of infectious disease testing programs and serves as an important reminder of how equity considerations are needed for SARS-CoV-2 testing and vaccination programs.</p>


  • Ridde Valéry, Gautier Lara, Dagenais Christian, Chabrol Fanny, Hou Renyou, Bonnet Emmanuel, David Pierre-Marie, Cloos Patrick, Duhoux Arnaud, Lucet Jean-Christophe, Traverson Lola, de Araujo Oliveira Sydia Rosana, Cazarin Gisele, Peiffer-Smadja Nathan, Touré Laurence, Coulibaly Abdourahmane, Honda Ayako, Noda Shinichiro, Tamura Toyomitsu, Baba Hiroko, Kodoi Haruka et Zinszer Kate (2021) « Learning from public health and hospital resilience to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: protocol for a multiple case study (Brazil, Canada, China, France, Japan, and Mali) », Health Research Policy and Systems, 19 (1) (mai 6), p. 76. DOI : 10/gjwdb7. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12961-021-00707-z.
    Résumé : All prevention efforts currently being implemented for COVID-19 are aimed at reducing the burden on strained health systems and human resources. There has been little research conducted to understand how SARS-CoV-2 has affected health care systems and professionals in terms of their work. Finding effective ways to share the knowledge and insight between countries, including lessons learned, is paramount to the international containment and management of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this project is to compare the pandemic response to COVID-19 in Brazil, Canada, China, France, Japan, and Mali. This comparison will be used to identify strengths and weaknesses in the response, including challenges for health professionals and health systems.


  • Stennett Jack, Hou Renyou, Traverson Lola, Ridde Valéry, Zinszer Kate et Chabrol Fanny (2021) « Lessons learned from the resilience of Chinese hospitals to the COVID-19 pandemic: a scoping review ». DOI : 10.1101/2021.03.15.21253509. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.03.15.21253509v1.
    Résumé : <h3>Abstract</h3> <p>As the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has brought huge strain on hospitals worldwide, the resilience shown by China’s hospitals appears to have been a critical factor in their successful response to the pandemic. This paper aims to determine the key findings, recommendations and lessons learned in terms of hospital resilience during the pandemic, as well as the quality and limitations of research in this field at present.</p><p>We conducted a scoping review of evidence on the resilience of hospitals in China during the COVID-19 crisis in the first half of 2020. Two online databases (the CNKI and WHO databases) were used to identify papers meeting the eligibility criteria, from which we selected 59 publications (English: n= 26; Chinese: n= 33). After extracting the data, we present an information synthesis using a resilience framework.</p><p>We found that much research was rapidly produced in the first half of 2020, describing certain strategies used to improve hospital resilience, particularly in three key areas: human resources; management and communication; and security, hygiene and planning. Our search revealed that considerable attention was focused on interventions related to training, healthcare worker well-being, e-health/ telemedicine, and work organization, while other areas, such as hospital financing, information systems and healthcare infrastructure, were less well represented in the literature.</p><p>We identified a number of lessons learned regarding how China’s hospitals have maintained resilience when confronted with the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. However, we also noted that the literature was dominated by descriptive case studies, often lacking consideration of methodological limitations, and that there was a lack of both highly-focused research on individual interventions and holistic research that attempted to unite the topics within a resilience framework. Research on Chinese hospitals would benefit from a greater range of analysis in order to draw more nuanced and contextualised lessons from the responses to the crisis.</p>


  • Traverson Lola, Stennett Jack, Mathevet Isadora, Zacarias Amanda Correia Paes, Sousa Karla Paz de, Andrade Andrea, Zinszer Kate et Ridde Valéry (2021) « Learning from the resilience of hospitals and their staff to the COVID-19 pandemic: a scoping review », medRxiv. DOI : 10.1101/2021.04.22.21255908. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.04.22.21255908v1.
    Résumé : <h3>Abstract</h3> <h3>Background</h3> <p>The COVID-19 pandemic has brought huge strain on hospitals worldwide. It is crucial that we gain a deeper understanding of hospital resilience in this unprecedented moment. This paper aims to report the key strategies and recommendations in terms of hospitals and professionals’ resilience to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the quality and limitations of research in this field at present.</p><h3>Methods</h3> <p>We conducted a scoping review of evidence on the resilience of hospitals and their staff during the COVID-19 crisis in the first half of 2020. The Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library website was used to identify papers meeting the eligibility criteria, from which we selected 65 publications. After having extracted data, we presented the results synthesis using an “effects-strategies-impacts” resilience framework.</p><h3>Results</h3> <p>We found a wealth of research rapidly produced in the first half of 2020, describing different strategies used to improve hospitals’ resilience, particularly in terms of 1) planning, management, and security, and 2) human resources. Research focuses mainly on interventions related to healthcare workers’ well-being and mental health, protection protocols, space reorganization, personal protective equipment and resources management, work organization, training, e-health and the use of technologies. Hospital financing, information and communication, and governance were less represented in the literature.</p><h3>Conclusion</h3> <p>The selected literature was dominated by quantitative descriptive case studies, sometimes lacking consideration of methodological limitations. The review revealed a lack of holistic research attempting to unite the topics within a resilience framework. Research on hospitals resilience would benefit from a greater range of analysis to draw more nuanced and contextualized lessons from the multiple specific responses to the crisis. We identified key strategies on how hospitals maintained their resilience when confronted with the COVID-19 pandemic and a range of recommendations for practice.</p>
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